Profession

Sommelier


Description

Ordering wine in a fine dining establishment can be an intimidating experience, but it doesn't have to be. A good sommelier enjoys working with diners as they choose the correct wine for the food they'll be eating. Sommeliers must also be knowledgeable about beers, ales, ciders and even after-dinner cigars. The sommelier must be familiar with both the restaurant's menu and the selection of wines he has available in the wine cellar. He has a hand in compiling the wine list or perhaps puts it together alone. The sommelier must maintain the list's integrity while providing variety between good, lower-cost varieties and higher-priced vintages. Choosing a house wine is one of the most crucial duties of a sommelier. The house wine must complement the cooking style of the restaurant and is the wine most commonly ordered by customers.A good sommelier can take the customer far beyond the basic rules of red wine with red meat, white wine with fish and into another realm of dining nirvana. He knows about every wine in the cellar and every dish on the menu and understands when to choose a wine that complements the food and when to select one that will provide a contrast. Even diners who are familiar with wines can benefit from the expertise of the sommelier. Sommeliers enjoy talking about wine and like to hear about wines their customers have tried.

Job Prospect

Very Low

Work Environment

Sommelier work in Big Hotels and Restaurant

General and Personal Skills Required

Average Salary

Cost of Training

Recommended Level of Education

Vocational

Professional Skills / Tools Required

Associated Disciplines