Profession

Conductor or Music Director


Description

A Conductor leads an orchestra, opera, or other musical ensemble through visible gestures, setting the tempo and shaping the groups interpretations and sound. Conductors often also serve as Music Directors for the ensemble, although sometimes these are separate positions. (In the capacity of Music Director, he or she will select the music for performance.) The Conductor then studies the musical score to determine how it should best be interpreted. A musical director, or director of music is the person responsible for the musical aspects of a performance, production, or organization. For example the artistic director and usually chief conductor of an orchestra or concert band, the director of music of a film, the director of music at a radio station, the person in charge of musical activities or the head of the music department in a school, the coordinator of the musical ensembles in a university, college, or institution (but not usually the head of the academic music department), the head bandmaster of a military band, the head organist and choirmaster of a church, or an organist and master of the choristers (the title given to a director of music at a cathedral, particularly in England) etc.

Job Prospect

High

Work Environment

Music directors commonly work in concert halls and recording studios, and they may spend a lot of time traveling to different performances. Composers can work in offices, recording studios, or their own homes

General and Personal Skills Required

Average Salary

Cost of Training

Recommended Level of Education

Bachelor

Professional Skills / Tools Required

Associated Disciplines

Music, Education